All My Sunsets

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Ciao a tutti!  Live from my terrace in Imperia, Italy — located in the Imperia Province, in the Italian Riviera, an hour and change each from Nice and Genoa.  This is a rare live post because while I document my life all day via social media, I haven’t taken the time to post — with writing feeling like a luxury with the never-ending checklist of items I have on my mind during the school year.  In the summer, though, I feel so inspired, my mind relaxed and free.  And this vacation is super special.  It’s 5 weeks!  Since I moved home from Italy, I went for a month for the summers of 2014, 15, 16, and 17.  They were each epic in their own way.  But I must say, this location is superb, the price can’t be beat, and I’m really letting myself relax — taking days to be super lazy while I can.   I also rented the scooter for the entire 4 weeks I am here — purely out of necessity because it’s an hour hike up the mountain from the sea . . . then I will bop around a bit before home.

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This is my 12th day here. I’ve popped around a bit on this trip, had a ton of relaxation, and my father arrived from Cologne yesterday.  He has a hotel down at the sea, allowing this sweet space to reflect at the end of the day.  My days and sunsets have blended together beautifully into a ritual of calm.  I take a long, lazy start.  I see which cats have come to greet me.  Eventually, I hop onto my scooter for an errand down the mountain, take a swim / workout, and eventually make it back up just before or during the long, lingering sunset.  I adore both the sea and the mountains, so when they combine like this plus the charming Western Riviera culture, I’m smitten.  Mickey Mantle wrote a book All My Octobers.  Mine will be All My Sunsets.

I keep vowing to update this frequently, but for the summer I will make it a habit and not censor myself.  I always remind myself the blog must be written fresh — it can be edited and polished into something beautiful later, but these are the thoughts I’ll refer to when I write something more.  And hopefully that habit will continue as I recognize it’s not a luxury; I love to write and should write.  But as I usually do when there’s a long lag, here’s what I’ve been up to since January 2017.

For MLK weekend 2017, I flew out to visit my hilarious high school friend Ellen in Malibu, then we road-tripped to Solvang (European style wine country place as featured in Sideways) where I met up with my great friend Jessica who road tripped from Bishop to join us.  I met Jessica teaching in Italy.  She went off to Germany for two years as I returned home and was living home in California a bit after an epic few months backpacking and volunteering in Southeast Asia.  It was so fun to make these connections, then back to NYC and enjoying dates around the city, tubing up at Hunter Mountain, then February break!  Up to NH for our annual ski weekend retreat with Fordham friends, then straight to Switzerland, where I had an amazing flight for $500 and a room for $100 a night right in the mountain of Wengen, a perfect ski base.

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I enjoyed sunny breakfasts overlooking the Lauterbrunnen Valley – probably my most favorite place in the world – and I’ve written about it several times here with Mom   and here with Brendan .   I pushed my limits skiing on the difficult slopes, relaxed in the spas, gazed at the stars, and flew back to NYC via Spain revitalized.

It wasn’t long before it was Spring Break!  I found yet another amazing airfare deal just over $400 into Milan via a long layover in Lisbon and home from Naples.  I got a day rate in Lisbon for my shower and nap, then strolled around the harbor in sunny delight and even more delighted by the quality of the food.  Then that evening I was in an airport hotel by Milan Malpensa.  The next morning I took the three hour bus ride straight to Genova (much easier than schlepping on an airport bus or train to Milano Centrale then the train to Genova).  I had an amazing Airbnb overlooking the sea in my old neighborhood in Genova Quarto.

 

I met for drinks and gelato with friends, visited old students and my old director at the international school

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Many aperitivi in this spot of Genova Quarto

and eventually took a night train — fun!– to Puglila.  That’s way down in the heel of the boot.  I know I wanted to go by Bari but didn’t know much about the region.  I had just seen a Conde Nast Traveler photo of the restaurant in the grotto,

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and then when I was searching for towns, I saw Polignano a Mare and that same photo popped up.  I knew I would stay there, and found an affordable and adorable room right by the sea.  I had charming breakfasts in the square, lazy days sunbathing, running and wandering, and enjoyed a special Easter Eve mass where they gave us holy water to bring to our homes.  The next day, I hopped on a train to visit my friend Joseph in Lecce, way down in the heel of the boot.  I met Joseph during one of my many visits to Bruges in 2010, and we have stayed friends ever since.  I wrote about my visit to see him in Ferrara back in 2013.    Too soon, I hopped on a train to Naples where I spent the night in a castle with views over the bay, and drifted off into sweet travel dreams on my own two story section of the castle.

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This is actually a sunrise

Image may contain: ocean, sky, outdoor, nature and waterAmazing.  I flew home the next day and was back in Europe three months later for my annual summer extravaganza.

I had a shocking and complicated breakup — but I don’t really discuss dating on this blog — this is pure travel adventure, so only as it relates.  But I was so wrecked, I didn’t even want to go on this trip last year.  But I went anyway because, I mean, it was booked.  I could always come home.  The same advice he gave to me when I was going through a horrible time and didn’t know if I could go on a month long Australian adventure.  Of course I went and it was amazing.  I arrived in a decent sized apartment in the city center of Genova for only 900 euros.  It had very good AC and a little terrace with no real view but hey – outside!  I holed myself up during the day, watching Netflix, ventured out to some beaches, meditated on the balcony, lingering over my coffee and wandering for sunsets.

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I spontaneously bought a floor ticket for U2 in Rome.  There were track fires, so I missed half the show, my hair covered in ash . . . but it was amazing, and healing.  “One good thing about music, when it hits you feel no pain.  Hit me with music.”-Bob Marley.  I tried to get back to Genoa, but track fires blocked the way.  I had just finished a travel writing book written by a woman who moved to Spello, Umbria with her husband and three kids — one year of expat life.  She put them in the local school! Amazing!  Il Bel Centro.  I was so enchanted by her writing (set during the second year of my Italy stay) , and had to see Spello.  I looked at the train departures, and saw one leaving, bought a ticket, got a 40 euro place on booking.com, and had an enchanting evening strolling around the hill town.  Magic.

Image may contain: sky, cloud, twilight and outdoorAlready feeling more like myself, I visited a high school friend in London where she toted me to a swanky Innovation event.  I didn’t even know that was a field.  They love to hire teachers.  Something to consider for the future.  We had great laughs and long late night chats.  Brunch in her neighborhood, then a train to Ipswitch for Jessica’s wedding celebration.  Jessica was the friend I just met up with in California. On that trip, she told me she was engaged.  They actually got married in Vegas when I was off to Italy — but flights to Vegas were so expensive that week – it was cheaper to go to Italy, and Jessica said she figured I would be at the UK celebration anyway! 🙂  A charming BBQ in her husband’s parents’ backyard, meeting friends and family, then off to the Fake Festival — amazing coverbands including for Queen an Oasis.  High tea the next day, then off to Belgium for a few nights to visit Jasper (I didn’t see Dave this year).  I love wandering the streets long enough to feel hungry again for my next Belgian treat: beer, bitterballen, cheese croquetts, waffles, chocolate, frites.

Then from Belgium to Milan where I met up with my Dad.  We took a tour of the city that included the Last Supper, which I’ve always wanted to see.  We also went to the top of the Duomo.  I love the Duomo as I wrote here when I first saw it!  Before long, we were on a train to Genoa, and Dad stayed with me a bit.  (We don’t see Mom in my summer adventures because she prefers to stay local in the heat).  Dad and I enjoyed day trips to the beach and lots of lazy time.  Then it was off to Constance, one of our favorite places.  We enjoyed spa time, a cruise to an island with Botanical Gardens, and then he was off and I was back in Genoa.  A few more beach days, a bus trip down to Florence to meet up with a Fordham friend.  It was 104, so we ducked into his hotel for cocktails and the most amazing water!  Then we dashed back out to buy leather jackets and then I was on the Flix Bus back home for a few more lazy, lounging days.  I arrived back home just in time for my birthday, celebrating with high school friends in my parents’ backyard just before dashing off to Lake Placid for 4 nights with Mom the next day.

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Mom won’t do Europe in the summer but she loves the cool mountain air and easy travel to a favorite region.  I paddle boarded and kayaked, strolled and laughed with mom.  It’s amazing how healing travel can be — the same healing does not happen if you just have time off.  It’s what you do with it, and the experiences and insight you have when you’re thrown out of your normal zone.  At least for me . . .

Back to school in the fall, and a 4 day weekend meant a trip to see a high school friend Kate — Ellen’s sister.  Ellen flew in from LA, so we all met there for a fab girl’s time, going to yoga, swimming holes, yoga, and then off on a long desert road trip to see the Marfa lights.

I had never heard about Marfa before, but after we booked, I listened to this favorite song and heard it right away “saw the lights of Marfa . . .”

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Soon after, I went to a yoga retreat up in Hunter Mountain, maintaining my peace and trying not to linger too much on the time spent tubing with him. 

 

Image may contain: sky, cloud, mountain, twilight, outdoor and natureThe rest of the year featured two outpatient surgeries, a 6 week virus that left me sick and weak and eventually in need of antibiotics which I had not had since 2010 because they are actually quite toxic for me.

2018 –I took a long weekend to Stockholm, Sweden mesmerized by the 6 hours of daylight, froze on a boat tour of the archipelago, and wandered the Medieval Center still decked out in the remnants of Christmas.   Before flying Norwegian Air back home (amazing planes, amazing air quality, amazing deal), I indulged in a massage in a classic spa.  Ahh!

There was still the February ski weekend in NH, although I had to take it very easy.   I got sick and gained weight from the antibiotics, despite upping my workouts, eating even better, and doing careful detox programs.  I was frustrated but it was time for a trip Ireland with mom. This one was epic . Over Easter, we started just north of Dublin in Donabate, with a sea view room.

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running along the cliffs in Donabate

My frisbee friend from Fordham messaged me when he saw I was in Ireland, and I drove in to meet him for drinks that first night.  The next day we went to Easter mass then drove down to Cork.  It was unseasonable cold and horribly rainy — not the gentle Irish rain.  No, the shower rain.  We were happy anyway, stopping off at a Cathedral along the way.  I made sure to run every day in Ireland, determined to get back in shape for my 5K races coming up at the end of the month.  When we made our way to Killarney, the highlight was a Dingle Peninsula tour where we stopped to HOLD BABY LAMBS!

I’m obsessed with sheep, so this was a dream come true.  The car broke down another day, and that led to a series of adventures but we ended the trip in Malahide on my mother’s birthday.  I arranged for our friend Mary Bridget to surprise my mother at the restaurant.  We met Mary Bridget at a hotel in Lake Como Italy, and we have been great friends ever since.  I wrote about her here:

Image may contain: ocean and indoorI returned from Ireland, and continued running almost every day — yet I didn’t stretch after a 5K, and did Irish dance on that tight hip and then tried running on it a day later.  My knee gave out massively, and I had to get an MRI.  I tore my meniscus in two spots, damage to the patella cartilage and several other injuries.  The doctor thought I might need surgery, and I imagined this summer adventure in a straight leg brace — how could I ride the scooter with that?  While I limped around work, I fretted over my summer and couldn’t imagine walking and running again.  I got the news that I wouldn’t need surgery, and on May 26, the doctor said, you should be feeling 90% in 4 weeks, and when you feel 90% you can try running.

By June 26, I didn’t feel as much pain anymore, and by the beginning of July I was able to get more aggressive again for my workouts. I actually discovered Barre which has been really intense while also being therapeutic.  I am now able to run for trains and jog through airports and other required travel running.  I hiked up to my airbnb from the sea, and with the fresh air, fresher food, and lifestyle I am feeling like myself again finally.

In addition to swimming and scooting around, I watched several world cup games over Aperol Spritz, and England vs Croatia when I popped over to Kent to see Jessica and her husband with their new baby boy!  Zia Kristin was so excited to meet him!  I returned home and got a swanky haircut in Monaco after several expensive salons butchered my hair – I like classic not trendy, Kate Middleton – not Vogue.  I had a bit of adventure getting back, watched France win the world cup, beaches, naps, writing, reading, Italian netflix, and Dad came to visit straight from Germany.  We drove to Alassio today for a glorious beach day and now I am updated on the blog, recharged in spirit, and excited for the new adventures yet to be written.

 

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These trips aren’t just luxuries; they are necessary healing retreats where I can be me.  The only thing that makes me sad is trying “hold on to these moments as they pass.”

I may be thinking of them in a Long December, but there will be more travel magic ahead.

 

 

 

 

 

Christmas Magic in Austria & Italy: Part 2 Vipiteno

See Part 1: Christmas Magic in Austria & Italy: Part 1 Vienna

I rolled into Vipiteno, exhausted and excited for the mountain air vibe.  I recognized the identifiable tower, and knew it was my stop.  Vipiteno / Sterzing is the northernmost city in Italy, pure Tyrollean charm.  As I have mentioned in previous posts, I’m in love with the fusion of Austrian and Italian culture you find in the Dolomites, a place where you can get a Bretzel mit Prosciutto and get naked in the spa for an Aufguss (special steam bath) and it’s not weird at all, then cap the evening off with a pizza.

I stood at the quiet train station, gazing up at the stars and wondering how I was going to get to my hotel, perched up on top of a mountain.  I thought there would be some cabs around, but none at all.  I was glad I had an international plan activated on my phone, so I called my hotel, and they sent a cab.  While I waited, I Instagrammed:

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Ahh that mountain air vibe! I’m up a mountain outside the little town of Vipiteno. Time for farm fresh dinner. I love love love this region! 💗Tyrol

In the meantime, I peeked at the hints of quaint homes up in the mountains, and tried to imagine the views I’d see tomorrow.  The cab wound up and up and up, and then I began to wonder and worry that perhaps it was too far out of town.  Would I be able to make the walk?  Would it be nice?  But as we pulled into the driveway, I could see stars even from the car, and the cozy glow from the windows let me know that, yes, I would love it here.  It was affordable during a very popular time of year as many Italian families go away for a ski week at this time, and it featured fresh air and farm to table food.  And that’s what I was excited for upon my arrival.

It’s always so exciting to drop my bags into a room after a day of travel and to know I have a place to call home.  I crashed onto the bed and eventually peeled myself off, freshened up, and went downstairs.  A solo female diner this time of year – a time for family and friends- was a bit of an anomaly, and they sat me in my own secluded section.  Waiting for my food, I posted:

My dinner date and I have a private dining area to ourselves. 🍷📖

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As a teacher, especially in the modern collaborative environment, I treasure “me” time, time where I can read, be alone with my own thoughts, relish the peace.  So this little moment was my perfect welcome to Vipiteno.  I was reading travel writing but can’t remember what the book was, perhaps A Day in Tuscany (but the author of Too Much Tuscan Sun).

After the hearty meal and vino, I drifted of to sleep in the cozy twin bed.  In the morning, I was treated to the beautiful views I had been anticipating, but sadly not the snow.

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What a beautiful start to my last day of 2015.  I followed the mountain down to the town, and while it was not a short walk, it was lovely and enjoyable.  I passed the local ski slopes, perched atop dry hills.  Would I ski?  It didn’t seem like the right weather, but I was hopeful that snow would be on the way.

Once into town, I could not get over the quaint, fairytale charm.  It was pure magic.

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The pastry shop featured a gingerbread replica of the main bell tower.

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my first views of this quaint town

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charming streets

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markets

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Tyrollean Tree

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Snow dusted peeks in the background

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The omnipresent bell tower

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this image made it to my Christmas card this year (2016)

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The buildings are advent calendars

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This image made it to my card as well

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Cute real evergreens from the local hills, posted around town

All the travel, all the hassles, all the stress of the season melted away as I wandered through the fairytale, excited for what would come next.  It was just so darned cute!  I have seen several Dolomite towns this time of year (Ok, 2 others) but this one was special, like straight out of a Christmas village.  Eventually, I made it to the spa, where I enjoyed an experience typical of the Dolomites – more like Germany than Italy, there is a communal area, like an indoor pool anywhere, with some hot pools on the side.  I swam laps, I read my kindle a bit, and I think I may have had an ice cream or something at the snack stand, wrapped in a cozy bathrobe.  But then I headed to where I really wanted to be, the naked area.

Each town in the region seems to have its own spa, and each has its own unique layout and feel.  This nude area was small, but nice.  There were a couple of indoor saunas and wet baths (Turkish saunas) and the outdoor saunas were lined up in a row, with beautiful views over the valley.  You’d have to dash quickly, but not too quickly because no matter how hard they try, the spillover from the hot tub will cause ice.  There was also a cold plunge pool, very welcome after 10-15 minutes in the Finnish sauna.

Inside, you can drink complimentary water or tea made from local herbs, wrap yourself in a bathrobe and swing in a cozy nook, curl up on a couch with German or Italian language magazines, or nap in one of the quiet rooms, where there seems to be no concept of time.  After a couple of rounds, I managed to melt away the remaining tension.  NOW I was on vacation.

I noticed the chalkboard featuring the day’s special Aufguss timing.  An Aufuguss a special ritual held in the super-heated Finnish sauna.  They keep the door open while you load in, placing your towel on the wood in such a way that you can sit as well as place your feet on it (it’s seen as poor etiquette to let any part of your sweaty body touch the wood).  The room crowds, and there are naked strangers way closer than you would normally think ok. But it’s the time honored communal experience, and with nobody creeping, it’s ok.  (The workers make sure to keep it professional, and it’s such  a part of the culture).

For my first Aufguss, the man came in, decked in his little loin cloth, toting a tray of scented iceballs.  I forget the “theme” of this Aufguss,  but let’s say some kind of lavender relaxation or something.  It’s quite a show as the room heats up. He fans the air with his towel, seemingly immune to the heat (a Finnish Sauna is 158-212 degrees Fahrenheit, and I am pretty sure this one was 110C).  He says all directions and greetings in both German and Italian, a great way for me to practice both. “Buon Schvitz” (Good sweat?)

After the initial fanning, he took one of the balls and ceremoniously smashed it onto the hot rocks, aromatherapy steam rising up, the room instantly growing hotter.  A flash to the senses, then he came around to fan everybody.  Each batch of people (5-10) got about 3-4 waves of his towel or giant paper fan as he came by for each pass.  All the while, sweat rushed down my body and I fought the urge to run out.  I can tolerate this.  I can stay.  It will be worth it for the exhilarating rush out in the fresh mountain air after.  

Finally, the last ball, the last sexy whipping of the heat into my face.  I copied the others and raised my arms to enhance the sensation.  And then “Grazie, si prega di doccia” Thank you, please shower.  And some other warnings to cool off and then rest.

The sauna experience cannot be rushed.  The body needs time to recover after the temperature changes, and it’s so easy and absolutely delightful to fall asleep after.  I did three rounds of Aufguss on this day, the final one, a special Capodanno one (Happy New Year).  The guy saw me sipping my tea, and invited me in to make sure I didn’t miss it.  I wasn’t sure I could tolerate another, but it was the most special, followed by a prosecco toast and panettone.  This was the most delightful way to end 2015.  I enjoyed dinner right by the spa.  Then I strolled through town, enjoying the lights, and decided I didn’t need to stay down until midnight.

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file_000-1I instagrammed this photo while waiting for my pizza.

Post spa glow. The last Aufguss was a special Capodanno one, including a break for an aromatic sugar scrub and followed by panettone and a prosecco toast! (An Aufguss is a steam event in the Finnish sauna where they pour aromatic water on the rocks in a special ritual followed by dancing with the towel to blast us with heat. The guy turned up music and was an awesome performer.). 2015 was good to me because I was good to myself! On to sweet 2016. But first a Quattro Formaggi pizza!

 

After my pizza and stroll, I walked up to the mountain, zoned out on the bed, and walked down to the markets just in time to grab a prosecco, listen to the DJ, and countdown to 2016!

 

To be continued with my first day in 2016 and the finale of the adventure.

 

Merry Christmas & Happy New Year!

christmaskristinGreetings from my childhood home, where I am enjoying a lovely break for the holidays.  I am saddened that it has been a year since I last wrote, and I am making sure to post often this coming year.  While the posting has not been frequent, the travel has.  Since my last post, I enjoyed a visit to Genova where I visited my old school and students, then off to  Taormina, Sicily, where I rented a Fiat and traveled all up and down the hills of Sicily, along with blissful wandering strolls.

That summer, I spent some time in an Iceland stopover, where I got to ride a horse for the first time, galloping across lava fields during an everlasting sunset.  The famous blue lagoon was fully booked during my stay, so I have a great excuse to return to the pristine country.  After, I popped over to Frankfurt where I visited a friend from Italy, then up to Hamburg to visit a friend from Madrid I met studying in Norway!  Then down to Bruges, Belgium where I met up with my friends Jasper and Dave to celebrate 15 years of friendship.  From there, I journeyed to Baden Baden where I spent a few days in a hotel that seemed straight out of Bourne movie, and dipped in spas I saw on Rick Steves Episodes in 2007, vowing one day to go.  It was fantabulous,  and so was the Black Forest Cake in  . . . the Black Forest.  After, I spent three weeks perched in a perfect apartment with a view, nestled on the top of a mountain in the Portofino Park.  I relaxed, recharged, and enjoyed views over the Ligurian sea with Genoa in the distance.  I used the area as my peaceful base, spending my days scooting around the coast, swimming in turquoise blue water, visiting old friends, watching the Olympics, and fantasizing about buying my own apartment up there one day.

I met my Dad in Lucca, a charming walled city, where we stayed a night before traveling back together.  He stayed in a hotel in Camogli overlooking the sea, down the mountain from my apartment.  We enjoyed breakfast every morning, and on my birthday, we took a ferry to a pristine beach called San Fruttuoso.  Each night, I made wishes on shooting stars, and fell into a peaceful slumber.  Upon my return, it was back to work, another school year.  I haven’t traveled since, and I couldn’t make it work for this Christmas due to the airfares, but I have some adventures ahead: a quick jaunt to Malibu and wine country for MLK weekend, and then off to the Swiss Alps for my February Ski week.

 

There have been way too many adventures I haven’t posted about, but let’s start with finishing last years Christmas journey to the Italian Alps!

Christmas Magic in Austria & Italy: Part 1 Vienna

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I moved home from Italy in July 2014, and of course I pined for my life in Europe but I have traveled abroad many times since then, keeping true to my promise to myself.  I visited the Dolomites last Christmas followed by a quick visit to Milan and Genoa.  In February I visited my old school and a quick popover to Malta for my first visit to the charming country, hosted by a dear friend and wonderful tour guide, My Maltese Guide: Stephen Place.  In April, I was back again, this time with Mamma and Auntie Minnie for a visit to Dublin where we enjoyed spring sunshine and were delighted by O’Connell Street as it was turned back to 1915 for the Road to the Rising.  Last summer, I spent a month based in Genoa–up and down the riviera and all around the city–and traveling all around to Malta for Stephen’s wedding, as well as Merano in the Dolomites with my Dad and Frankfurt and Brugge with a former Genoa coworker who now works in Germany.  It was amazing, and there are so many wonderful stories and adventures to share along with the Grand Farewell Tour of Italy back in 2014.

In the interim, I started working again at the NYC public schools, but due to the  negative political climate and micromanaging pulling me far away from my best practice as well as the enormous class sizes (34), it was time to move on.  I’m now working at a great school in the suburbs, but starting a new job for the third time in 3 years has been rough and I haven’t been able to blog much at all, but at least I’ve been traveling.

The trip itself is a wonderful escape, but the travel is made up of so much more: the planning, the pure delight of anticipation, the chaos of the packing, the sweet sigh of relief once boarding the plane, the exhausted landing, the shower nap and feeling human for dinner on arrival night, breakfast the next day, and the magical surprises and wanderings, the photos, and all the joys.  But of course, some of the greatest joy lives on in my memory, fresh upon my return, then deepened through reflection.  Sharing these stories helps me relive it and enhance the joy.  As I travel, I live in the moment, and I also know my future self will love this moment.  In addition, I love the idea of sharing the moment with people like you.  Thanks for reading.

Prior to my departure, it was a very stressful and chaotic time at work, with 4 classes to prep, an 8 page synthesis paper to grade that ended up taking about 16 hours, and all the holiday events and fun obligations that I didn’t want to miss, finding time to squeeze in cooking healthy and workouts, and then, just before Christmas my work backpack was stolen from my locked car right in my driveway.  They snagged my work chromebook, my copy of The Catcher in the Rye I read in high school! Annotated copies of other texts, IB textbooks, and a sentimental scarf someone knit for me in Italian colors before my move to Genoa.  Among other personal items, I loved the bag itself.  It was extra stress at a time I could barely take anymore.  I definitely needed a vacation, and I was glad I didn’t plan a whirlwind tour but more like a relaxing, fun escape.

But first, I enjoyed a wonderful holiday at home with family.  I helped cook for Christmas Eve dinner, sang in Midnight Mass at Fordham University, returned home around 2am to see Santa had arrived as always, and drifted off to a peaceful sleep.  The next day, we opened presents, ate well with loved ones, played with the mini drone I brought my brother, and just relished Christmas.  The day after was pajama day– a blissful day of rest and relaxation to culminate a stressful season.  Finally, time to bask in the glow and joy of the season.

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It’s always hard when I plan to depart during Christmas vacation.  It’s a time of togetherness and family, of bonding and simple pleasures around the tree and fire.  Is this really the best time for solo travel?  Yet, I needed this solo peace to finally be alone with my thoughts, to relax, to wander and discover, to connect with my beloved Europe, to practice my Italian language, and to recover from the stress and let the healing begin.

On December 27th, I headed to my kundalini yoga studio for my regular Sunday practice, where two childhood friends were in town for the holidays (from Austin and LA), so I got to see them really quickly, get in a good workout and begin my relaxation.

Then I gathered my last minute things, drove to my apartment in NY, and packed my things.  It was hard to say goodbye to my family, especially my great aunt who was in town visiting.  I knew when I returned, the tree would be down, the presents packed away, the lights off, and the festive mood diminished.  Yet, I still had a week to enjoy these Christmas treats with a European take.

I darted off to JFK, boarded the air train, and navigated the long security lines, arriving at my gate with just enough time for a pre-departure beer, the first time I got to say ahh for this trip.

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I sipped my Rebel IPA, then boarded my Air Berlin plane where I realized I was upgraded to an XL seat for free.

On top of that, there was nobody next to me.  I had enough room to cross my legs and really stretch out.  This was off to a great start.

With a brief transfer in Dusseldorf, we transferred to Vienna for an easy train ride to the city center.

 

vienna  I was really excited to start my trip off with such a connection because when you are exhausted and groggy, these little things make a big difference.  I noticed how close the green countryside was to the city center, and how convenient the airport was!  Great location and infrastructure.  I tried to avoid falling fully asleep because I’d miss my stop, then exited in my neighborhood in a slightly outer ring of the city center.  Except for a 20 minute pause  on a train on my way to Budapest in 2006, I have never been to Vienna.

I was surprised that my hotel was even closer than I thought, so I didn’t have to lug my bags too far at all.  Good thing, because since my trusted travel friend North Face backpack was stolen, I didn’t have time to replace (those decisions aren’t made lightly) and I grabbed a Vera Bradley shoulder tote, packed to the brim with my most valuables,  Macbook Pro, SLR camera, smaller camera, iPad, Kindle, etc.

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The hotel was quaintly decorated in the Tyrollean charm and Christmas decor that drew me to the place (along with the price less than $60 a night!)

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As it was only around 10:30, it was too early to check in, but I dropped off my bags, and wandered around the neighborhood, into the fresh winter air that was a welcome change since it was in the 70s on Christmas day in the NY/NJ area.

I didn’t grab a map or consult my phone; I just picked a direction and wandered, following spires or interesting sites.  I was clearly wandering around a quiet residential area, families with strollers, few tourists, and then eventually I got so groggy I didn’t think I’d make it any longer.

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I wanted to duck into a bar for lunch, although as it was December 28th, many places were closed for the holidays — and I’d guess many folks were off skiing as what happens in Italy.  With so many world class mountains and sites nearby, I couldn’t blame them.

At the hotel, it still was not check in time, but the restaurant was open for lunch so I sat down for a delicious pumpkin soup and cheese spatzle, featuring fantastic, vivid flavors that I can still taste in my mind today.

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Soon after, my room was available, and I crashed onto the inviting bed for my nap, setting the alarm for 7:30pm.

It was very hard to pull myself out of my blissful slumber as the sunshine of the day faded into a glowing sunset, and the bustling street below quieted to just the occasional passing tram.  I looked out at the evening, as windows decorated with understated white candles reminded me that Christmas has been here, and forced myself to wake up.  I jumped in the shower and went out to explore, selfie stick in hand. After consulting a map, I knew which way to go for the city center, and was instantly struck by how quiet and unassuming the city was.  It was elegant, clearly full of culture, yet calm and classy — not at all overwhelming.

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I posed for this selfie in front of a gorgeous church, then wound my way to the Ring Strasse (a circular boulevard following the old wall of the city) and into the pedestrian shopping center, decorated in lights and attracting the nighttime action seekers.

 

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Christmas market stalls closed for the evening

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nighttime energy

 

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Opera

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Opera masks and elegant gowns

 

As it was about 10pm, it was a struggle to find a place to eat, but I didn’t want to grab street food or tourist cafeteria food, but then I stumbled upon the Hard Rock Cafe.  And as much as I know I don’t travel to Vienna for American culture, I knew it would be a good place for a beer and some nachos, which I was craving.  As I sat there, I watched groups of friends–local and travelers–enjoying a night out, while I read, nibbled, sipped, and reflected on my observations so far.  I’m here in Vienna!

 

 

I wandered back to the hotel under starry skies and drifted off into a very peaceful sleep. The next morning, since breakfast wasn’t included in my rate and because I was finally on vacation where I could sleep in, not be a slave to an alarm clock, I slept in and in and in, finally rousing myself sometime around 1pm.  This meant that I was not going to see Slovakia today, just a short 1 hour train ride away.  It felt weird to start orienting myself to another city and new country when I had barely seen this one!

And it was still a long time after that before I emerged into Vienna.  I needed to chill.  I needed to not have a schedule.  I needed to just be on vacation and not guilt myself about it.  I was happy. But I also needed some purpose.  With only two days in Vienna, I knew I had to stop at the desk and grab tickets for a show tonight.  I chose to purchase tickets for a 7:30pm concert of Mozart and Strauss’s works at the Schönbrunn Palace, a former Imperial summer residence, where each composer had performances.

From my magical walk the evening before, I noticed a quaint cafe that said “Breakfast All Day.”  As it was the late afternoon and I hadn’t eaten yet, that was perfect.  I went in and ordered crepes with Nutella and couldn’t figure out what Melange was (apparently plain coffee, even in the English translation).  The crepes were delicious, but I had to spread the Nutella myself.  I sipped on my green tea and watched the sky darken before 4pm, turning into that blue twilight, while tourists and locals popped in and out for snacks or drinks like Aperol Spritz.

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I instagrammed:

Nearly everything feels so classy and elegant in Vienna, including this cafe. (The crepes didn’t last long enough for the picture.)

Then I tried to catch the ring tram, a tourist tram ride that goes around the Ring Strasse a long with informative narrative. I thought it would be a great way to get a grasp of the city while relaxing and enjoying the sites.  Sadly, I got to the tram stop just shortly after 5, so I instead wandered a bit along the Danube, and posed for this selfie.danube

 

Then I had just enough time to get back to the hotel to change into more glamorous clothing for my concert. Back to the tram (glad I bought the 24 hour ticket) and instead of walking into town, I used the tram plus the u bahn (subway) to get to the palace.  I would have liked more time to tour the palace, but with only 2 nights in Vienna and in desperate need of rest, this was more about just soaking in the vibe, taking a peek, orienting myself, and gathering ideas and inspiration for future visits.

I walked in, one of the few solo people mingled with an international crowd.  It was not assigned seats, so the usher showed me where I could sit at my price range, a seat in the middle, and then the magic began.

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I closed my eyes and entered the world, listening to music that was a delight for people for centuries.  For several of the works, they had vocal accompaniment with a soprano and a baritone, and they also featured two ballet dancers for some of the works.  What a delightful treat capped off with a performance of Stille Nacht (Silent Night) sing along.  We had lyrics in both German  and English on our seats as they invited us to sing in any language — but the group led first in German and then in English.  That was incredibly moving.

There were a couple of tricky interruptions as the Italian child behind me grabbed and pulled on my chair, and I had to turn around several times, one time as the brother started to talk and the mother put her hand over his mouth.  70 euros each for children who might not get it?   But at the same time, a nice cultural introduction.  The sweet old man next to me kept making jokes in German, something about Stille Nacht and something about something else.  I just smiled and nodded.  And eventually I had to apologize and say, “I am sorry, I only speak English.”

Moved and culturally enriched, I happily walked home and into sweet dreams my last night in Vienna, an elegant, sweet cultural city with so much to offer.  I decided to take a later train to Vipiteno, Italy the next day, allowing me enough time for a museum visit tomorrow.

I awoke at actual breakfast time, and enjoyed a great spread for just 12 euros.

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The creamy spread is made with pumpkin!  I took my time, relishing my silent thoughts, dropped my bags off, and walked to the Belvedere Palace, which was just a 5 minute walk from my hotel, featuring one of my favorite paintings, Gustav Klimt’s “The Kiss,” which I think I only know about from this Rick Steves Episode:

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I decided to buy the 20 euro Klimt ticket, allowing me to see “The Kiss” in the Upper Belvedere Palace as well as Klimt’s women in Lower Belvedere Palace.  The grounds were beautiful even in the winter, and I knew I wanted to return to see them blooming in spring or summer, the elegance of Before Sunrise

I didn’t feel like a long visit or have time for it, but I did a brief gallery walk around the other rooms to get my fill of beauty, but as always, I opted out of the audio guide and didn’t try or force myself to read everything — just when something jumped out to me.

And then finally, “The Kiss.”  It was big, and absolutely moving and gorgeous in person.  I decided I’d like a faithrful reproduction one day. In the next room, was the recreation of the painting where you were invited to post a selfie with it for a chance to win.  I opted out of that, but I did take these selfies in the grounds outside:

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And then strolled around lower Belvedere Palace, appreciating Klimt’s sketches and several other beautiful works.

Back to the hotel, and off to the main train station where I attempted to wait on the line to get actual seats for my journey to Innsbruck then to Brenner and Vipiteno, the Northernmost Italian city, right over the Austrian border.  Unfortunately, the line was not moving and quite chaotic.  A worker finally sent us to another area, but we weren’t on the right line, and a rude woman said “We are on this line, ahead of you, waiting like everyone else.  You have to wait,”

And I said, “We were sent this way.  We weren’t trying to cut.  We didn’t know.”  Then under my breath I said, “Fuck this shit” while the worker wondered if he actually heard me, as I went back to the ticket machine and took my chances on a ticket without seats and up to my track just in time for departure.  Without seats, I dumped my luggage, took my purse and day bag, and sat in the dining car, a guaranteed seat and meal where I could watch the scenery roll by.

I ordered a beer and pumpkin soup, my newest obsession since the restaurant meal, but they were out so I switched to smoked salmon, then later had dessert, something in vanilla sauce.  2 hours rolled by quickly, and then I found an open seat for some rest before arrival in Innsbruck.

Next stop, Brennero, the border of Italy for a quick change to the local train to my little village, as I will feature in Part 2.  Vipiteno.

Sweet Valencia, Spring Break 2014 part 4

For the other Spring Break 2014 posts, please visit:

Semana Santa in Espana: Spring Break 2014 Part 1

Malaga with a Side of Morocco: Spring Break 2014 Part 2

More Malagahhhh: Spring Break 2014 Part 3

I didn’t know much about Valencia or even where it was exactly.  Then a few months before my trip, a friend had traveled around Spain and said “Valencia is one of my favorite places!” She loved the beach, the vibe, and the amazing architecture of the Science Center which was a surprising highlight I just “have to visit.”

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Valencia flies under the radar, and perhaps I wouldn’t necessarily have thought to hit it on my first visit to Spain. But this was my fourth visit, and I had freedom to explore more.  As I’ve mentioned many times in past posts, sometimes those lesser visited places yield the greatest travel joys.

When I realized I had this entire break to myself, free to go wherever and whenever I wanted, I played with itineraries, peeked at flights, and decided to fly back to Italy from Valencia at the end of my journey.  I had wanted to visit Grenada after hearing so many wonderful things, but you can’t do everything and as my grandmother always used to tell me “leave something to come back for.”

I awoke that final morning in Malaga for one last breakfast and took a cab to the bus station where I took a bus to Valencia.  Yeah, they had trains that would get me there much more swiftly and comfortably, yet to my cranky surprise, they booked up before I looked the day before.  I didn’t realize all the seats could sell out, leaving me with about 9 hours of a bus ride.  I considered bla bla car or a rental car but one was a bit inconvenient as I hate small talk and didn’t want to be “on” for the journey, and the other was a bit too expensive.  I was not thrilled for such a long journey, knowing restless legs and possible motion sickness and stale air awaited me, but I do like napping in coach seats which are a bit cozier than trains. . . sometimes.  And sometimes you can see better sights rolling by the window from a highway than from tracks.  So, having chosen my option, I was optimistic and excited to move on.

After turning inland from the coast and exploring rolling green hills, we ended up in Grenada for a layover.  I was hoping to see something, but it wasn’t long enough and there was nothing within walking distance of the bus terminal, so my wishes to experience and immerse myself in the beauty of this Andalusian charm will have to wait for a future visit.

En route, we were treated to an endless display of eye candy that changed from hills and flowers to rugged red rocks and desert land.

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Some of the eye candy during the long journey

We had an extra long stop when they had to search the entire bus, holding us up even longer.  I thought they were looking for drugs, but my father later said that it was probably something a bit more severe.  As I tweeted at the time, “That canine drug search really helped break up the 11 hour bus ride today.”  I would have actually really enjoyed the journey if it didn’t delay us so much.

By the end, I was antsy and tired in that too exhausted to even rest way, but once we rolled into Valencia the weather was balmy and the discount hotel was inviting, right on the beach promenade.  I plopped onto the bed, opened the window and shutters, and listened to the sounds of the sea and the chatter of a lively neighborhood at night.  Eventually, I found the energy to peel myself up and go for an evening run followed by a wandering stroll, one of my favorite things to do when traveling.

The next morning, I took a lazy start, followed by my continental breakfast where I watched Pharrell’s “Happy” video, hearing it for the very first time.  I sure was.

To this day, I still think of my sunny, peaceful Valencia sojourn whenever I hear it, which is often on repeat on my iphone while I’m doing a quick 10 minutes of burpees or while running around my neighborhood.

During my morning stroll, surrounded by happy, friendly people, I kept thinking of the amazing time I had on this vacation.  I tweeted:

Spain got it right! Free & well-maintained beaches; great food and wine; gorgeous scenery; progressive, multicultural vibe; and wonderful people!

I admired the white sandy stretch of beach, framed with low hills in the distance and edged with a smooth stone promenade.  This had a Euro-Cali vibe, and I could have stayed forever.  I began to dream and scheme of living here one day, where the prices were much cheaper than Genoa and most of Europe, and the quality of life was rich and beautiful yet simple.

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A “Happy” Beach Day

I was listening to my 120gig ipod classic on shuffle and hit a Chicago song that I loved.

 The refrain repeating in my head as I walked .  . . “feeling stronger every day.”  Absolutely.  I’ve overcome a lot during my transition abroad, I have a lot ahead of me as I prepare for my return home, but I’m going to be just great.

My father had gifted me the Chicago albums years ago, but I never explored them much.  This was a perfect calling to indulge.  I kept walking through the soft sand for a couple of hours under the sun, a warm breeze, palm trees, happy people, happy me.

As I listened, I definitely remember loving this song, which was was featured in the Mad Men season premiere at the beginning of the month, which I had watched just before my departure.

Feeling groovy, I stopped for lunch along the beach.  I don’t remember what I ate, but I remember what I saw: blue sky, blue seas, smiling faces, and a sand sculpture of The Last Supper.

I indulged in a relaxing massage on the beach after a swim, then closed my eyes for a bit of warm bliss, summer on the horizon. Later that day, I darted over to the Science Center, and even though I was told it was amazing, I was not prepared for how stunning the architecture was, especially under the bold, cobalt sky.

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Some of the eye candy during the long journey

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After admiring the outside for a half hour or so, I toured some of the hands-on exhibits inside, which were not just for kids.  How high can I jump?  What is my memory? How are eco friendly buildings constructed?   How do things work?  So much to see and experience.

Instead of taking public transportation back, I decided to walk along the river promenade, which eventually led me to an Andalusian festival, funny because I had just departed that region of Flamenco.

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I explored that inland neighborhood of Valencia, grabbed a burger and beer al fresco, hopped on the tram and arrived back at my hotel late that evening to cozily tuck myself into bed.  The next morning, I was on a plane back to Milan for the end of one of my favorite vacations ever.  There was a time when I was intimidated or restless traveling alone, but now it has become one of my most favorite ways to go.  It was like a week of meditation, indulgence and self love.  I was refreshed and ready for whatever came next in this time of uncertainty and change.

I posted the following successive tweets:

Few people can say they truly follow their dreams. I did, and I keep dreaming and scheming.

I love traveling with myself because I philosophize uninterrupted and I’m good company, always doing fun things at my own pace.

With that said, it’s only good as a break from the norm. Thoreau built that cabin in the woods yet regularly walked into town for society.

An alpine peak is amazing alone, yet even a hilly meadow is sublime in the right company.

Later that evening after traveling from Milan, I entered my apartment and saw my cozy bed.  I opened the French doors to the terrace and I tweeted “After all the beautiful places, I still find Genoa gorgeous and am happy to call her home for a few more months.”

Bressanone Christmas Markets: The Charming South Tyrol

The streets of Bressanone / Brixen

The streets of Bressanone / Brixen

Last December, I wanted to go back for more German Christmas markets, yet after so many weekends of whirlwind travel, my budget told me to look in places accessible by train.  After long rides to Munich for Oktoberfest the past two years, I saw that the Italian Dolomites were an extremely attractive travel destination.  The train always glided by as the grand, jagged mountains silenced the passengers with awe.  A quick google search brought me to the website for the Christmas Markets of the South Tyrol:

After, I hopped onto booking.com, noting that most hotels were sold out, too expensive, or too far away, requiring a car.  Yet, there was an extremely affordable option in Bressanone / Brixen.  Towns in this autonomous region go by Italian and German names since those are the two official languages of this area that is more Tyrollean than Italian.  After googling the town, I learned that the hotel in Bressanone was walking distance to the train station, the markets, and the spa.  Booked!

The South Tyrol

The South Tyrol

The Alto Adige region of Italy, the South Tyrol.

The Alto Adige region of Italy, the South Tyrol.

It was more than a 7 hour train ride from Genoa, so once again, I dashed out of my 8th grade class exactly at the end of the day at 3:30, onto my scooter, downtown and onto the 4:10 train for Milan where I’d catch my connection to Bressanone.  Yet, my train was late.  And it got even more delayed en route.  Even though I had a 35 minute transfer cushion, my train rolled into the station at the exact time my connecting train for Verona was departing.  I leapt off the train, sprinting with with my backpack, and got to the train for Verona Porta Nuova just in time.  I leapt on as the doors closed and the train glided away.  Safe!  Sweet Relief.  Yet, this train was different.  It didn’t look like the other trains I took to Verona.  I didn’t remember there being a business section.  Just as I noticed that, I heard the announcement, “Treno per Torino Porta Nuova.”  OH NO!  I didn’t catch my connection — I got on the wrong train.  There was no time to check the track so I headed in the general direction of trains I’d taken to Verona and Venice before.  I tried in vain to open the doors, pressing the button frantically as a businessman said, “Non e possibile.  It’s not possible. It’s too late.”

I didn’t have a ticket or a reservation or a seat, and now I was heading in the opposite direction. I talked to the conductor for help, and they had me stand outside their little room– a weary, seatless vagabond–while they called for assistance.  They said my ticket would not be transferrable to Verona because I got on the wrong train. Luckily, though, they did not charge me for the ticket to Torino.  They said they would tell their colleagues on the train from Torino back to Milan but they could not guarantee that I wouldn’t have to pay for a ticket just go get back to Milan.  I started arguing with them, losing my cool in complete frustration with Italy’s complete disregard for punctuality, saying “I didn’t know an Internet ticket wouldn’t be valid later.  That’s not fair.  I have nowhere to sleep tonight!”  They responded, “This is Italy.  The customer is not protected. You have no rights.”  Raised on American service, I still could not adapt to this concept as I apologized, thanked them for all they did do for me, and silently fumed in an empty seat as my train pulled into Torino.

Rolling into MIlan again, having gone nowhere in the past 2 hours, I took a chance by going to the ticket desk as if I haven’t just gone to Torino.  The ticket agent was understanding, and gave me a a new ticket to Bressanone, yet I was informed there were no more trains tonight, so I’d have to spend the night in Verona. I called Booking.com to notify the hotel I wouldn’t be there tonight, booked a hotel in Verona by the train station and shortly I was there in a tiny yet cozy single room where finally I could sleep.

The next morning I indulged in a great breakfast spread, hopped onto a train, and eventually to Bressanone, which, to my surprise, was not snow-covered as I had hoped.  Ironically, my snowy Christmas market experience was not in the alps but actually the normally soggy and milder Rhineland.  Bressanone was still absolutely beautiful in its eager, chilled wait for snow.  I love places with the “mountain air vibe.”  It was simultaneously exhilarating and relaxing, filled with action and adventure, families, couples, singles . . . everyone just here to enjoy, a combination of chillaxing and adventure.

At the hotel, I was pleasantly surprised by how charming it was for the price.  I was also delighted that the hotel chose not to charge me for last night since they were notified. Yes!  I gazed at the mountain views, dropped my bags, then began wandering around the markets.  It was definitely like stepping into a fairytale in this crossroads of cultures, where you could order a crepe with Nutella, a brioche, a bratwurst, or a German pancake all at the same stand.  I ordered a funnel cake with lingonberries, eyed the shops for tomorrow, took some photos, then hit the spa.

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quaint streets

quaint streets

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The best kind of advent calendar

The best kind of advent calendar

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Like German spas, there was a no-clothing allowed area.  I was used to that in Germany, but in Italy, bathing suits are usually compulsory in all areas–even the sauna–so I was really hesitant as I slipped out of my bikini.  A few shy steps, and then I noticed confidently nude folks all around me, sipping wine, snacking on aperitivo, and heading into the saunas.  Before long, I was alone in an outdoor hot tub, naked under the stars in absolute bliss.  The travel stress melted away and only this moment existed.

Afterwards, I went for a nice swim– the only one in the saline lap pool with grand windows– and then back to the hotel for a long, dreamy sleep.  The next morning, I over-indulged at the breakfast spread, wandered through the markets some more, then visited the presepi museum.  Presepi are Italy’s nativity scenes, and in the tradition of St. Francis, they are often set in familiar Italian settings to help make the story more relatable.  Like little dollhouses.  The museum had very ornate sets going back to the 1700s.  After a casual stroll,  I checked out of the hotel. Still no snow but much peace.  I walked out of town, along the babbling brook, gazing at hilly vineyards and farmhouses, happy hikers, and the promise of good tidings.

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Enchanting

Enchanting

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I snagged an afternoon train back to Milan where I was so lucky to have a seat as it was as crowded as a NYC subway at rush hour, elbows and purses assaulting my head in the car so hot it felt like I was back in the sauna, but clothed.  I was so glad I booked a hotel in MIlan for the night to break up the journey, although it also meant that I had to jump on the 6:10am train back to Genoa where I’d hop on my scooter and dash into the school just in time for work.  Another fantastic weekend, but a lot more zen than whirlwind this time.

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For more Christmas Markets, my post about the Dusseldorf Markets, 2012.

Dusseldorf Christmas Markets

I’ve been obsessed with Christmas Markets since I was a kid.  I always liked quaint decorations, fairytale villages, and a calm, peaceful throwback style of Christmas.  As a teenager, I’d flip through my AAA newsletter and see the “European Christmas Market” tours, which first got my mind going.  This is a thing?  People do this.  I want to see!  In 2006, Rick Steves, my travel idol, released a special Christmas in Europe special.  I’m watching it right now as I type this actually.

I bought the set as a gift for my mother which also included a Christmas CD and a cookbook, and thus began our annual tradition where we’d watch and get in the old-fashioned spirit. He took us to England, Sweden, Norway, Italy, France, Austria, Germany and Switzerland for enchanting markets, beautiful scenes, and heartwarming traditions.  I really wanted to go!  But I was a teacher, and most of the markets closed on Christmas Eve.  How could I fly to Europe before break? Then finally when I planned a trip to Belgium after Christmas in 2009, I learned the markets of Bruges and Brussels were open!  I bundled in many layers, and wandered for hours and hours enjoying the setting.  I finally got to a European Christmas Market. But Germany was the king.  I had to go.

Once I moved to Italy, that became a weekend option.  Several colleagues wanted to join me in December 2012, my first year.  As we were all on a budget, we scanned Ryan Air for affordable flights to German cities.  While Nurenburg and Bremen were more famous, the ticket prices were exorbitant even for Ryain Air.  So, we soon booked flights to Dusseldorf.

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In early December, we dashed to the train station after work for the 1.5 hour trip from Genoa to Milan.  As we approached, we looked out the window and saw the tracks and fields covered in  . . . snow!  Living in the temperate Mediterranean climate of Genoa, snow was rare and special, so we were super excited and totally in the Christmas spirit.  We hopped on a bus to Bergamo airport where we learned our flight was delayed because of the snow.  We worried our flight would be cancelled, but thankfully it wasn’t.

When we finally did land in Dusseldorf, our entire flight had missed the bus transfer to the city center.  Yes, Dusseldorf has an airport right in the city with easy train connections, yet to get our bargain price, we had to fly to a commuter airport way outside the city.  It was around midnight when we approached the customer service desk. “What do we do?” We asked frantically.  We tried to get a cab, but the queue was too long as everyone else was doing the same thing.  Exhausted and faced with the possibility of sleeping on the airport floor, we were delighted when she said, “We have a hostel here on the property.  We only have a few rooms left.  We could book them for you, and you could go to Dusseldorf tomorrow morning.”  After a bit of deliberation, we were so excited for a bed and said, “Yes!”

While the hostel was on the property, it was about a 20 minute walk away through snowy, dark woods.  Some of my colleagues were freaked out, but I was mostly intrigued by the new surprise and pretty location.  The air was fresh and crisp, and the hostel was like a little farmhouse, warm and inviting with basic accommodation.  I took the single room since I actually like being alone, and fell into a deep exhausted sleep.  I awoke the next morning to wooded snowy views, met up with my friends, and finally took our bus and train connections to Dusseldorf as the sun rose over the serene landscape. IMG_0769 IMG_0772

The snow caused a nightmare travel interruption–and I felt really guilty since I planned everything on this super tight budget– but we were safe, well-rested, and Dusseldorf was covered in a rare magical white blanket.  We were still in the Christmas spirit.  To make it even better, the hotel in Dusseldorf did not charge us for our first night since we had informed them we couldn’t make it.  Awesome!

This was not my first trip to Dusselforf.  I had popped through on a tour of the Rhine with my friend Mike while studying abroad in the English countryside back in 2001.  The Rhine had flooded, although I still remember Dusseldorf as charming and adorable.  Those pleasant memories helped inform my decision to return.

Dusseldorf: charming and magical in the snow

Dusseldorf along the river: charming and magical in the snow

The streets were decked in quaint and tasteful decorations, extra magical with the freshly fallen snow sticking to the trees and lamposts.  It was cold, so we had to keep ducking into cafes for a hot chocolate or a quick bite.  And it was so crowded that it was hard to check out the wares in the stalls without being swept away by the tide of holiday shoppers.  But it was all worth it.  I was ecstatically happy to be there with new friends and about to see old friends in a couple of weeks when I flew back to America.  I loved my life.

There I am on the TV peeking into an electronics store

There I am on the TV peeking into an electronics store

Christmas gingerbread cookie -- sorry I had to devour you, Rudolf

Christmas gingerbread cookie — sorry I had to devour you, Rudolph

magic sparkle

magic sparkle

markets!

markets!

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happy colleagues

happy colleagues

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Gluhwein stall

Merry Christmas from Dusseldorf!

Merry Christmas from Dusseldorf!

IMG_0803 I bought some ornaments and trinkets, drank a few glasses of hot mulled wine (gluhwein) in souvenir glass mugs, and then after dinner we were back in the hotel changing for a fun night out.  While I intended to return to the hotel early to chillax, I ended up staying out super late because Dusseldorf’s party street was filled with so many fun folks and great vibes.

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Dusseldorf’s party street

Made some new friends out in the Dorf

Made some new friends out in the Dorf

Since it was 2012, everyone went crazy for Gangnam style, especially the Germans. in the club  I will always think of Dusseldorf when I hear it.

Cheers and dancing, and finally a tipsy, happy walk back to the hotel for a deep slumber. It was a quick yet magical visit, and I knew I was totally not done with Christmas Markets.  As I’ve said before, I don’t travel to check things off a list.  I travel to experience and enjoy. I enjoyed this!  Merry Christmas!  Buon Natale!  Fröhliche Weihnachten!

2 Years Gone

“Do not cry because it’s over; smile because it happened.”-Dr. Seuss

Yesterday, I walked out of the building for the last time as a teacher.  Saying goodbyes to colleagues I wouldn’t see this summer, I eventually choked up on my way out the door, overwhelmed that I was leaving my favorite job, my favorite apartment, and my beautiful home in Europe, walking distance to the sea.

This was a dream I had for many, many years – probably since I took my first trip to Europe in 1997: Paris, the Riviera and Rome.  The tour also included Florence and Assisi — and I realized I loved Europe, loved the way I felt in Europe, and wanted more.  I studied abroad in England in 2001.  I backpacked alone for the first time that summer.  I came back the following summer for more.  I kept coming back.  I remember telling a close friend,”When I close my eyes, I see Europe.  It’s all I want.”  I dreamed, and schemed, and then in January 2012 I accepted my job, in a story as told here when I celebrated 6 months in Europe.  I almost chickened out, but I knew in my gut it was the right step, a necessary check on my timeline.  And when it was time to decide whether to stay in this beautiful, peaceful, comfortable life or move on to my next adventures, I waffled and struggled, but for many reasons, I knew that it was time for NY.  Maybe not forever, maybe just for a year or two, but for some reason, it’s time to be in NY.  When confronted with the easy path or the hard one, I know I will grow from the challenging path.  As weird as it sounds, the challenge at this point is to move home.   I have enjoyed every moment of my time here, and rather than stay and resent certain things or wonder what if, I am leaving at my peak of enjoyment, preserving the memory.  But before I tie the bow on this experience, I have a Grand European Farewell Tour!

I remember my New York Grand Farewell Tour.  From February until my August departure, I savored every moment of my life in New York, visiting things like a tourist, going out with my friends as much as possible, and realizing how great things were at home.  With this new trajectory, I scraped off my barnacles and felt revitalized and full of energy.  Of course,  none of this was easy.  The emotions of leaving my job, friends, family, car and familiarity; the bureaucratic paperwork that took until just days before I hopped onto my plane–my friends wondering if I’d even be able to go when I was at my farewell party; packing my apartment for storage and shipping some belongings overseas; completing the days of paperwork and office visits upon arrival; figuring out how to get a cell phone and internet, how to ask for things at the grocery store, how to call a taxi, where to find tacos, where to buy cheddar (not in Italy!), where to get deodorant with antiperspirant; cooking daily; purchasing and riding a scooter; retrieving contacts stuck in customs; changing that strange fluorescent light bulb; getting the guy to get the geckos out of your water heater; getting stuck places because of delays or train strikes; dealing with Italy in general.  But it was all worth it, and it was all possible thanks to the kindness of my colleagues and the patience of my friends and family who listened to my homesick gripes as they faded.  Genoa became my home.

They say you can’t go home again, so I know I’ll have to reacclimatize to  New York City, finding my more relaxed Mediterranean ways might not suit me well in the frenzied city.  Yet I will have friends, family, and all the things I’ve been missing.  I am setting new goals, treating my time back in NY as possibly temporary, so I need to enjoy it while I can.  I want a nice apartment (no downgrades since I love what I have now); I have my leased car and I’m going to get a scooter there as well!  I’m going to try out more adventure activities (rock climbing, kayaking, whatever comes my way).  I’m going to do more US travel on the weekend.  Friends in Cali and Chicago, I’ve never been to Colorado, Skiing in Vermont — so much to see!  I’m going out in the city as much as possible mixed with many chill dinners at home with my closest friends.  I’m also looking forward to my cats; I’ve been known to Skype them.

The job search from abroad was certainly tricky.  I had resigned from the NY City public schools, so I wasn’t guaranteed a job in the system.  I had to apply to even be considered as a candidate.  Then I had to find the right fit.  All through email or skype and with a time difference.  Yet it worked out!

I absolutely love where I work now.  I’m happy to say that my new school is also an excellent match for me: internationally minded,with coworkers who have worked abroad and/or traveled extensively like me, IB-inspired, semi-selective and serving a community of students who want a rigorous curriculum despite their incoming scores (except for the honors classes–which are selected).  I will only be teaching 11th grade plus one elective (currently I teach 8,9,10,11,12). I enjoyed the variety of 5 grades, although it will be nice to just have one preparation so I can focus.  I really liked what I saw when I flew in last month for both the school visit and a wedding,  Just before I received the official job offer, my boss told me that my job opened up again here.  I had agonized over the decision, spent a long time preparing for my job search, and ended up with something special and rare.  I knew I couldn’t second guess.  I just had to go, so I accepted the offer and am on my way.

But first:

A few days here to enjoy the gorgeous weather of June in Genoa.  Days at beach, nights at beachside bars, perhaps dancing.  Riding my scooter all around.  Then next week, I fly to Belgium to visit my friends in Ghent and enjoy a charming canal view hotel room in Bruges.  Upon my return, I have some time in Genoa again before Krakow with a friend for 4th of July weekend.  I fly back, then that evening, two great friends from NY will be staying with me to explore the region.  After they leave, I have a day to pack for my big adventure and pack up my apartment for the big move.  I head to Interlaken, Switzerland in the Alps for a charming 2 nights on Lake Brienz, one of my favorite spots in the world.  Peaceful reflection, hiking, biking, swimming. . . ahh!  Next, I take a train to Constance, Germany where I meet up with my father.  We will visit spas, museums, and explore with a car. Next, we take a train to Merano in the Dolomites, for hiking and fresh air, followed by Trieste where we meet a family friend, then a drive to Lake Bled, Slovenia (new country for me!), then to Rimini for a night, a quick peek at San Marino, then finally a couple of nights in the Cinque Terre before my shippers come.  Dad and I enjoy a couple of days in Genoa, he leaves, then I have a few final days before back to the USA.  It’s been great, and there are great things ahead.

 

My 10th grade students were so sad I was leaving. They wrote a sweet card, thanking me for "Being the Best English Teacher We Ever Had" and gave me this gorgeous Murano Glass Heart necklace. So touched!

My 10th grade students were so sad I was leaving. They wrote a sweet card, thanking me for “Being the Best English Teacher We Ever Had” and gave me this gorgeous Murano Glass Heart necklace. So touched!

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I was wearing the perfect outfit for this sweet gift. That evening, I went to Milan for the evening to meet up with my brother and his girlfriend who just arrived from NY. This is in my hotel room there. I spent a lot of time in Milan hotel rooms coming and going somewhere special or meeting with friends and family.

For our last Italian class, we walked down to the sea for aperitivo and Italian conversation.  Our colleague/teacher gave us these wonderful gifts so we can take a bit of Genoa with us!

For our last Italian class, we walked down to the sea for aperitivo and Italian conversation. Our colleague/teacher gave us these wonderful gifts so we can take a bit of Genoa with us!

I’m enjoying every moment.  Right now, I’m enjoying a lazy day in bed, the door open to my terrace as the sunshine spills in, birds singing sweet melodies that are the soundtrack to my life here along with the occasional scooter.  I have the peace and time to reflect.  Content.  Filled with gratitude.  I have been truly blessed.

Prost! Oktoberfest – Year 2

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in the famous and festive Hacker tent, one of Oktoberfest’s 12 main venues.

Ever since I was a kid, Oktoberfest has been a bucket list item.  I crossed that off my list with last year’s trip as featured here on this blog.  However, as it was my first time and a very busy weekend — I didn’t get the full experience.  It was rainy and soggy.  I was confused and unsure about what to do and where to go.  How do you get in a tent?  Any tent?  We were unsuccessful on Saturday night, and tried to see the scene on Sunday around 10:30am.  I was impressed and in awe of the festival atmosphere and how nearly EVERYONE was dressed in a dirndl or lederhosen.  I didn’t want to drop 100 euros on one, especiallly in the cold, rainy weather.  But, I vowed to return next year, and with a dirndl!

This year, I hemmed and hawed about booking.  Did anyone want to go?  Hotels were too expensive, with a 12-bed hostel room costing 160 euros! Airfare was insane.  Then a week and half before the last weekend of Oktoberfest, I went to the train station and booked a night train.  I hopped on booking.com and found an affordable single room in a hotel outside the city in Passing, located a short walk from regional and S-bahn connections to the city center.  My colleague was staying with a friend 45 minutes away in Augsburg, and we arranged to meet up via WhatsApp.

On Friday October 4th, I darted quickly into the staff BBQ held in our school’s courtyard, then back to my apartment to change into jeggings and a comfy top for my night train.  I strapped on my backpack, straddled my scooter, and was off for the train station.  At 1am in Verona, I boarded my night train for Munich.  But . . . it wasn’t so easy.  I walked to the train as it approached the platform, but car 181 was not there.  The conductor said, “Ah, 181?  You must wait.  It’s on the way.”  Odd.  Then a few minutes before the train was to depart, 181 arrived.  A woman approached me and said, “It is a regular car.  We don’t have any beds left.”

“But I booked a bed.  I need to sleep.”

“I know but we don’t have it.  It didn’t come.”  This was a German train.  I was used to this kind of chaos in Italy but was absolutely suprised to see this with the German rail system.

“I need to sleep.  I’m going just for Saturday and it’s going to ruin my day.”  I said it sweet and concerned.

“Ok, I’ll get to you in a minute,” she said.  Meanwhile, fellow Italians in my same predicament started arguing with her.

“We must sleep!”  They shouted.

“Don’t yell.  I don’t have a bed for you.”

“With all these beds?” one man said, gesturing to the empty cabins visable as the curtains were drawn.

She pulled them into the cabin and they disappeared.  Then she returned to guide me to a bed.  They found a room for us, and someone was hustling to throw in sheets and pillows as they set up the beds (6 in a cabin).  I was so insanely grateful not to be spending a sleepless and uncomfortable night in an upright coach seating.  My friend Anna and I did that once, booking a last minute train trip from Amsterdam to Switzerland after unable to find accomodation there.  They were out of beds, so we spent quite a sleepless night  . . .  and at one point, along with an American guy we met, we went into one of the compartments, pulled the curtains, and made sex noises to scare others away.  It worked, and we were able to stretch out and get some sleep while others crowded in the hallway outside.  Overall, it was not an experience I was keen to relive on my short weekend.

I curled up into a ball and started to fall asleep the minute the train started moving.  Ever since I was a baby, I loved to fall asleep in moving vehicles.  Even if I’m not tired, I will want to sleep on a train.  And if I have a bed? Perfetto.  The Italian gentlemen were chatting noisely to each other, snapping photos for facebook, but eventually they fell asleep.  But then, we were interrupted.  “Passports, passports!”

Wait, they are waking us up to check our passports as we enter Austria?  But when I ride the train in the daytime, they don’t check anything!

Then an hour or so later.  “Pardon the interruption.  Is there a doctor on board?”

Then an hour or so later.  “Tickets, tickets!”  Yes, they woke us up to check our tickets instead of checking them as we boarded.  UM!

Then an hour or so later. “Passports, passports!” as we entered Germany.  Luckily, I fell asleep after each of these interruptions, but with each interruption, the Italians started chatting again.  I lost a lot of sleep.  Then of course, the signal in the morning that we were on time and rolling into Munich Central Station in 20 minutes.

Even at 6:30am when I exited the train, the station was coming to life with dirndl and lederhosen-clad folks in good spirits, awaiting a day of fun.  Many people were even sleeping on the station floor, taking a break between last night’s festivities and the 10am opening of today’s tents.  I freshened up at the restroom sink, hopped on the S-bahn to drop my bags off in Pasing, then returned to purchase an authentic dirndle across the street.  As the old woman zipped me up, she said, “You look great!”  Then she tied my apron knot on my left side, asking “Are you single?  I hope you are,” she said pointing to my cleavage.  “You will have a lot of fun tonight!”  I later learned that you wear your knot on the left to indicate you are single.  On the right if you are taken.  Brilliant!  But there was no equivalent for men with their lederhosen.  Well, that’s not fair.

Oh, men are so darned sexy in those leather suspender pants.  They are never washed, and they say they are better the older they are, after many days of wear, sweat and beer spills.  Starting at 90 euros for the lederhosen alone, I was suprrised at how many men invested in them along with the gingham top and sometimes even special shoes and socks.  Yet, I dropped 100 euros on my dirndl and 20 for the half shirt that goes underneath . . .   if you’re gonna go all that way, dress the part.  And the slightly cheaper train station ones were only a fraction of the quality of the authentic ones found across the street.

I felt at home, part of the scene in my Bavarian attire.  I posted some pics on facebook and twitter, then sat down for a nice fruhstuck (breakfast) at a delicious restaurant in the train station.  I was enjoying the food, the energy of the scene, and people watching.  Then I headed for the fairgrounds, ducking into a small tent for lunch, where they let me in as a single, seating me with a random group of early 30 somethings.  As often happens at Oktoberfest, we became fast friends, drinking, saying “Prost,” and sharing jokes and tales.

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They were mostly Americans (New York and Chicago).  And the guy next to me was from the Netherlands.  One of the Americans said, “Did you ever  have a bucket of ice thrown on you in the middle of sex?”

I laughed at the random intimacy and said,  “No!”  And he said, “It’s not fun.  They did it to me last night.”

Then they asked what’s the secret to get in the tents?  I explained that I only got in at 10am on Sunday last year, and that I had no idea how to get in but we had some German connections who were going to help us this year.

“They’ve got to accept money, right?  Someone’s gotta be paid!” he said.

“I’m not sure that works,” I said.  “Nothing worked last year. . . ” after a long pause, I added matter-of-factly, “That was a wasted blow job.”

The Indian-American Manhattanite in front of me said, “Aw, can we keep her?!”

Before long, my friend arrived at the fairgrounds, and I left the group to go meet up with her.  We vowed to keep in touch, and they said they’d let me know when they were in Italy.  (They are a bunch that loves to travel. This was their second year in a row at Oktoberfest).

My friend and her German friend arrived, and we walked around the fairground as it started to rain.  Both of us set into panic mode, traumatized after last year’s cold, soggy experience.  Tents were closed.  We couldn’t get in anywhere . . . or so we thought.  We ended up at a cute little dessert tent that looked like a fairy tale castle.  We joined the short line as I pulled up the Oktoberfest pamphlet I downloaded on kindle for iphone. ” Oh, this tent has sweets and prosecco and wine,” I said.  “But no beer.”

But it was cute, it was dry, it had alcohol and there was live music!  We went in and had a blast.

We squished at a table, ordered our food including traditional kaiser schmarrn, and before long, we were dancing on the benches to the live music, featuring traditional German songs, Neil Diamond’s “Sweet Caroline,” and modern hits such as “Blurred Lines.”

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The energy was positive and reminded me of the vibe of a wedding.  Good music, alcohol, food, strangers and old friends dancing and singing together — a positive carpe diem attitude.  Let everything else go.  “Eat drink and be merry for tomorrow we die.”  I vowed  to return to Oktoberfest annually if I could, even if I was in the States.  I would make it happen.  This was not a bucket list item. This was a new tradition!

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This video does not adequately capture the mood because vibes are non-transferrable.  But it can give you an idea:

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After about four quick hours, we decided to leave the crowded tent and try getting into the Hacker tent.  Hacker is one of the most popular tents, decorated with blue skies and filled with folks of all ages enjoying the Hacker-Pschor beer in the classic oversized glass Oktoberfest mugs.  Earlier that day, we heard that there was a waitress we could pay Schuzen tent.  We got our 25 euros ready, but the bosses were around, and she couldn’t take bribes.  This time at Hacker, we knew someone else who knew someone else.  His waitress friend got us all in, so we paid an extra 5 for our 10 euro beers as a thanks.  Minutes later, I was invited to squish up, standing on the bench, dancing to “In the Mood” and ACDC’s “Back in Black” and all kinds of fun tunes.   After every song, it seemed, the band had us sing the German drinking song “Ein prosit, ein prosit . . . ” After which we would all clink glasses and drink!  A special wordless bond forms as you make eye contact with a stranger over your crashing mugs.

Another round of giant beers.  More dancing.  Then a stroll around the very, very crowded venue — so packed that sometimes we couldn’t even walk, ribs getting crushed, guys reaching out to flirt, couples kissing in the corners, everyone in great spirits.  Back to the benches for more dancing and another beer.

Again, this video is just a peek at the scene in the Hacker tent.

For much of the night, I danced next to a woman in her early 60s who only spoke German, so I said “Dat is Gut!” Then a guy at the table behind us fell onto me as I collapsed onto my knees on the slippery table top.  He offered to buy me a beer, but I had no need for another at that point.  We met many more people — lots more singing, lots more dancing.  Then the final song.  Michael Jackson’s “Heal the world.”  We all swayed back and forth in a dizzy, tipsy glowing happy mood.  A local said, “They play this as the last song on Sunday night.  Too bad you can’t be here tomorrow.  When they close Oktoberfest, it’s very emotional.”

After 8.5 hours of beer, music, dancing and partying, I was happy and satisfied as I boarded the S-Bahn for Pasing and back to my hotel room.   There were after parties, but I was done.  I took a shower and crawled into my comfy bed for a blissful sleep.  The next morning, I awoke to church bells, enjoyed a delicious breakfast spread, and headed back to central station.  After buying a few of those traditional bavarian gingerbread cookies, I was on my train and headed for Genoa again.  I napped, enjoyed the stunning scenery that rolled by, and had one of the best meals in all my travels: Austrian Kalbsbutterballn.  Meat in butter.  Yum!  Oh, and nobody checked our passports at either border crossing.

I was so glad that I had the opportunity to go again and to live the great vibe under the tent.  I’m grateful that my parents gifted me some money to help make my travels possible.  In Italy, when a project such as a bridge, highway or rail network, is funded by the European Union, they post the EU flag along with an explanation of the project.  My parents need to design a flag so I can post it along with all my pictures.  Danke Schon!

Prost!

Without Reservations: Travels of an Independent Woman

Back in Italy for year 2.   Three weeks after landing, I’m getting settled back into my routine, learning to let go of home again, and moving forward.   I had such a relaxing, restful summer with the people I love most, so it broke my heart to leave again.  Yet Genoa welcomed me with sunshine and stunning views, and along with some wonderful people, she reminded me that this is home too.

My flight landed on the 25th of August, and I began work on Monday the 26th — a week preparing for our students with evenings swimming in the Mediterranean or scooting about with Stella.   The next weekend, I was lucky enough to return to Venice as one of my best Fordham friends and her boyfriend were about to depart for a 2 week Adriatic cruise.  We shared an apartment one vaporetto stop away from the train station, and enjoyed a delightful Friday night strolling the streets, searching for the most perfect restaurant while catching up.  I was jealous of their upcoming cruise, but Kristen reminded me that I live in Italy.  Even if I had to go to work on Monday, it was the start of a new school year at a job I love, a far cry from the chaos and stress of the life I left behind in the overcrowded schools as one of many frazzled and under appreciated NYC teachers.   On Saturday the 31st, before they boarded the “People Mover” to their cruise, Kristen handed me her copy of Without Reservations, a book she mentioned over dinner in the US this summer.  A woman leaves her job for about 9 months, to follow her dream of immersing in several European locales without reservations.  She was going to avoid planning and to see what happens.

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I began the book yesterday.  The best and worst aspect of living alone far from home is Saturday morning.  I wake up in my cozy, renovated apartment with its terra cotta and marble floors, exposed brick, and garden views.  I wake up too early due to the ever present bells, birds, and scooters.  I make some coffee.  Maybe turn on Netflix or Apple TV.  I check to see if I got any iMessages or texts on WhatsApp.  Scroll through email.  Scroll through my Twitter and Facebook feeds.  And it’s only been 15 minutes.  The weekend looms before me, all mine for whatever I want to do, whether that is nap on the couch, stare at the wall, or travel somewhere.  But as exciting as independence is, it’s also lonely.  We are wired for family.  And I left mine in the States.

I went to move my scooter, but it was so beautiful and sunny that I couldn’t just go back inside after circling the block, so I rode along the coast.  I hit a snag of traffic and tried something new . . . passing the huge line of cars, crossing into oncoming traffic cautiously, and relishing the true pure joy of owning a scooter.   Winding high in the Ligurian Hills, with the Mediterranean to my right, glittering in the sun, I could smell flowers and fireplaces.  I saw my reflection in the rearview mirror, and I was smiling.  I paid a price for this, but what bliss!  As I reached Recco, known for inventing delectable focaccia formaggio with its flaky crust and liquidy stracchino, I climbed high into the hills on unexplored little roads, treating myself to sublime views.  I stopped Stella and was about to reach under the seat for my iPhone but realized I didn’t have it.  I just stepped out for a minute . . . didn’t plan this.  So, free from social networks, free from sharing the experience, I was able to fully immerse myself in it and enjoy in the moment.  It felt more special and pure as a result.

I wound my way down the hill, past super fit bikers challenging their lycra-clad quads, and headed back home where I changed into a swimsuit to hit the beach before the good sun was gone.  The pebbles were strewn with seaweed, providing a softer than usual bed.  I fell asleep to the cadence of Italian voices.  When I awoke, I practiced deciphering the sounds, realizing that I understand more than just snippets of conversation these days.  “Watch me, watch me uncle!”  “I can’t believe what she said.”  “We had ravioli and prosciutto and [kisses fingers] it was delicious.”  “Children, it’s time to go.” Real conversations.

I waded into the choppy water for a good workout.  Instead of just swimming, I have been using the aqua-size skills I learned from Mom’s class at the Y.  And since the salt water makes us more buoyant, I can do these exercises without the flotation belt.  It’s fun, and I can do both cardio and strength training while enjoying the stunning scenery all around me.  After a half hour of cross country skiing, reverse jacks, hamstring curls, etc . . .I swam back and towel dried.  When I reached into my bag, I saw the book from Kristen, and as the sun turned into the Golden Hour, I began.  Over a year later, I’m still in awe at where I am and what I am doing.  The old me would have read this book with complete longing, traveling vicariously through the author.  Now I read it as a companion to my own journeys.

I was drawn in right from the opening inscription:

There are years that ask questions and years that answer.  -Zora Neal Hurston

This is my time for answering, I suppose.  While I am temporarily rooted in Italy, I have the freedom to wander on weekends and breaks, or even after work.  I have the mental space to reflect and allow my mind to wander.  And after all the hard work of settling in last year and prepping for 5 different classes while learning the IB and catching up students who were behind . . . ahh . . . I have space and free time this year.  It is wonderful, and I have earned it.

When Alice Steinbach left for Paris, a friend said “Cheers to a successful trip.”

What I didn’t say was that “success” was not something I was seeking from this venture.  In fact, I was determined not to judge this trip, or its outcome, in terms of success or failure.

As I noted in previous posts, expectations breed disappointment.  I am trying to take this adventure as it comes: the good and bad, the wild and relaxing, the painful pining and euphoric awe . . . filling my days with wonder and writing my story.  I’m writing some of it here as I reflect along the way.  But my mother reminded me, “Your story is not yet written.”  Who knows what is next?  All I know are my plans for class and the trips that I have booked.  Sitting here on my couch, shipped from NYC, with my cozy favorite blanket and a bottle of Barbera del Monferrato vino . . . I relish my freedom and independence.  I don’t want to live like this forever, and I won’t, so cogliere l’attimo.  Back to my book.